Nearly 60,000 pounds of frozen chicken sold at Aldi and other stores recalled

Several frozen chicken products sold at Aldi and other stores are being recalled due to a possible salmonella contamination.

On Monday, the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service issued an announcement saying that Indiana-based Serenade Foods is recalling “approximately 59,251 pounds of frozen, raw, breaded and pre-browned stuffed chicken products” that may be contaminated with salmonella. The recall names five items under three different brands: Dutch Farms, Milford Valley and Aldi’s Kirkwood brand.

The USDA previously issued a public health alert on June 2 related to these products.

The recalled items were produced on Feb. 24 and Feb. 25 and bear establishment number “P- 2375” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to distributors nationwide and include:

  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “Dutch Farms Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese” with lot code BR 1055 and a best-if-used-by date of Feb. 24, 2023
  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “Milford Valley Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese” with lot code BR 1055 and a best-if-used-by date of Feb. 24, 2023
  • 10-oz box of two individually plastic-wrapped packages of “Milford Valley Chicken Cordon Bleu” with lot code CB 1055 and a best-if-used-by date of Feb. 24, 2023
  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken, Broccoli & Cheese” with lot code BR 1055 and a best-if-used-by date of Feb. 24, 2023
  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken Cordon Bleu” with lot code CB 1056 and a best-if-used-by date of Feb. 25, 2023

Officials said they are investigating a total of 28 salmonella cases across eight different states since late February likely related to the recalled chicken.

“Unopened intact packages of raw, frozen, breaded chicken stuffed with broccoli and cheese were collected from an ill person’s home and tested positive for the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis,” the announcement said.

Officials said some of confusion likely arose from the fact that the products look ready to eat but are actually raw and need to be cooked in an oven before consumption.

The USDA investigation found some of the sickened consumers said they didn’t follow the cooking instructions on the package — instead choosing to microwave the breaded chicken or cooking it in an air fryer. Others reported undercooking the product or not checking to make sure the internal temperature reached the recommended 165 degrees.

According to officials, consumption of food contaminated with salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses.

“The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product,” the announcement said. While most people recover without treatment, some people may experience diarrhea so severe that they need to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have severe symptoms.

Customers can view the product labels of the items here. If you have any of the products on the list, officials say you should toss them or return them to the store where you originally purchased them.

Samantha Kubota contributed.